walking

Appalachian Trail -March 23 2015- October 1 2015

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Two years ago! I can’t believe it has been that long, and I can’t believe it has only been two years. I can still close my eyes and find myself on some distant mountain in the Appalachians. Today I am finishing up packing our resupply boxes for the PCT! I can’t wait to get back on trail!!!!

Flask and I will be starting in Campo on May 13th 2017!!!! Happy Trails! I hope to see some of you out there! ❤

 

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Hiking for a Cause

Hey guys!

So, I’ve been thinking about hiking to raise money for a cause. I used the website: hike for and decided to hike for the Sierra Club (http://www.sierraclub.org/) and the Pacific Crest Trail Association (http://www.pcta.org/). If you want to make a pledge, then check out my hike profile here:

http://www.hikefor.com/Captain_Planet/PCT/2017

The plan is to start in May 2017!

I choose the Sierra Club after reading this disturbing article today:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jan/19/bureau-land-management-federal-lease

I first noticed (first hand travels) that this was happening in 2009…how sad that it is going to get worse. A lot of places are going to be ruined for mining in addition to the places they will make inaccessible by charging ridiculous fees for “improvements.” Some of my favorite places on earth have been “improved” out of existence by rich people who think that nature should be covered in concrete, fancy lawns and flush toilets. The switch to state control is a big mistake. Captain Planet disapproves of this obvious move towards privatization. Take action guys!

 

PCT 2017

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October 2016, Mother Earth and I did a little hike on the PCT near Lake Tahoe. It was a spontaneous hike without much thought or planning. I did manage to take a peak at the weather, so we only stayed on night. The first snows came the following day. We hiked up to a nice campsite on a ridge. We set up camp and made dinner right away. As we unpacked the food, I realized that I packed the extra dinner bag rather than the actual food bag I had prepared.

I looked at mom  with slight alarm and thought “Will she be mad?”

She laughed for awhile at my mistake and eventually asked me which one we should have for dinner.

I responded with “Which one do you want for breakfast?”

We laughed again. All food is good food when you are hungry.

It was cold enough for us to put on all of our layers and windy enough to get us out of bed at 3am to relocate at a sheltered spot a few miles back down the trail. Night hiking probably sounds ridiculous or even dangerous;however, it is second nature to night hike for a thru-hiker, and I was glad to have the experience with Mother Earth. I want her to be comfortable making decisions in the wilderness that really take into account all possible actions. Night hiking sounds like desperation, but really it’s a good  example of how overcoming cultural fears leads to more freedom and safety in the wilderness. As a female hiking solo on trail, I often night hiked away from sketchy individuals sleeping at shelters or roads and stealth camped.

As we walked down the trail we saw three shooting stars, the tail end of the Orionids meteor shower.In the morning our stomachs grumbled about oatmeal. As we walked out, we followed a rainbow back to the car. A big storm was blowing in and the rising sun caught the western curtain of rain. Collectively we saw about 12 rainbows.

Currently:

I’m trying to decide if I want to blog on my AT site or start a new blog for the PCT, what do you guys think?

Flask and I were sitting around last night discussing the not so distant future. We’ve decided to leave around the 28th of April  2017 for the southern terminus of the PCT. Before we hike we might take a little trip down to Baja with my cousin who has decided to hike with us. Before any of that we are thinking of visiting family, so pre-trail is going to be an exciting time! We might even take a train cross country!Starting in April we are going to be moving about quite a bit.

Post-trail we are thinking of doing some exploring in British Columbia and Alaska. We are hoping to finish sometime in early or mid-September.

Currently I have printed out my guide, and I have most of the gear I need. Flask and I are marking out our resupplies on the map. In Jan. and Feb. we will be putting together our self-care packages and making our dinners. I plan to complete a vegetarian backpacking cookbook when we finish this next trail. My first attempt at making my own meals definitely had some failures. Hopefully it will all come together on the PCT, and I can finish up writing my recipes.

Stay tuned, there is much to come!

Katahdin: 2,189 miles

Oct0ber 1, 2015

 

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The trail was a stream…

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Met Horse and Chesapeake while climbing the mountain…today felt like any other day.

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I wish I could have done Razor’s edge…wasn’t confident enough to go alone o.o guess I’ll just have to go back…dad?

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I offered Horse and Chesapeake a ride back to town…so we left together.

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When we got to the bottom of the mountain…I found a note saying: Captain Planet- your ride broke down.

Under that note was one to Horse and Chesapeake: Your family is here.

It was a weird change of events. I caught a ride with them instead and as we were driving back we saw Mother Earth go blazing past. We flipped the car around and chased her for a good ten miles, until the ranger station. We called it the Mom Car Chase. We were going about 60-65 on the tiny road leading to Baxter.

It was fun to laugh and yell and honk the horn. I was super glad for the ride, for the smiles and for new friends at the end of it all.

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Kevin turned the big 60 today! We celebrated his 60th birthday and the end of trail with an awesome dinner and chocolate cake ^_^ Happy Birthday Kevin!

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Thanks guys! I couldn’t have done it without you.

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I’m proud of myself for sticking with the blog, got a few more days left until I really “finished” trail ^_^

Lunar Eclipse:Night hike to a view

09-27-2015

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My mom took this picture^ We were both out watching the eclipse that night ^_^

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Mr. Bill’s knife and Mama K

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I said goodbye to Flask and walked off to complete the last bit of trail. As soon as we parted I saw a moose! I spent the day walking at a good pace. In the evening I stopped at a campsite on a lake so I could watch the eclipse.

After awhile the campsite got overrun with other hikers. It was a small site, and I wasn’t feeling social, so I packed my gear and left right after sunset. I watched the big yellow moon rise over the lake as the eclipse started. I got to the base of Nesuntabunt Mountain and found an empty shelter. I could see the eclipse through the thick pine forest throughout the night. Gradually the light was dimming and the moon was glowing red.

The climb up the mountain was difficult to follow in the dark. It went up through large cascades of boulders and I kept losing track of the white blazes. Every so often I would stop, feeling lost, and frantically look around for trail markers. The forest grew darker and darker as the night went on and my headlamp kept going out because it was broken. I kept seeing the forest flash in and out of existence. Every so often a white blaze would flash by.

I found my headlamp in a hiker box. The battery cover was broken and I had tied it together with a headband for the past few months. My hiker trash headlamp made the journey up the mountain a terrifying experience. When the light went out, I would stop and calmly look at the moon. After a few moments of darkness I retied the headband and continued my trek.

When I got to the top of the mountain I found two tents set up in the middle of trail. I was profoundly annoyed because I wanted to keep walking, but the signage was right between the tents. I picked a direction and apologized for disturbing the hikers then continued onward. I didn’t get far when I realized that I had chosen the incorrect direction.

The trail steeply fell away, and I found myself standing at the edge of a rocky cliff. I felt fear on trail a number of times, but this was true terror.  I sat down and looked out to Katahdin and above me was the full-lunar eclipse, a giant blood red moon. I searched nearby the viewpoint for a flat spot to camp because I didn’t know where the trail continued. I found a nice stealth site…OFF-TRAIL o.o and pitched my tent for the night.

In the morning I woke to watch the sunrise in the distance. I sat at the viewpoint and ate my oatmeal. I was thinking about Mr. Bill, so I took a picture of his knife with the mountain in the distance. This was the most breathtaking night I experienced on trail, certainly a grand finale.

Ha ha ha- A little side note: I looked up the meaning of Nesuntabunt Mountain…”Three humps”—the mountain has three summits and is surrounded by granite cliffs.

Franconia Ridge

8-25-2015

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In the morning we woke to fog. The clouds that formed the beautiful view the night before were foreshadowing. A storm rolled in as we crossed Franconia Ridge. We were near the highest point of the ridge, above treeline, when the thunder started. So we ran from rock to rock as rain started pouring down. As we moved along, the rain turned to sleet, then to hail.

I lost Mother Earth’s camera this day due to water damage. Yonder and I made it down the mountain without injury and trudged through ankle deep water for several miles. It was late in the day, we were drenched and everything in my pack as wet when we reached the second hut. We wanted to stay, but the crew wasn’t receptive because of the rain. So we had some hot soup and bread in our dry woolies, then put our freezing wet clothes back on and climbed up the next mountain looking for a campsite. Near the top we found a tiny site in the forest of death.

From here on out I took pictures with my flip phone and disposable cameras.

Mt. Liberty

8-24-2015

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We hitched back to trail later in the day after much debate about the weather. We climbed Mt. Liberty and stealth camped in what I had taken up calling the forest of death. High elevation forest in the White Mountains consists of an Alpine ecosystem that often looks as if every tree might blow over at any moment. There are few places on the ground to put a tent, so we carefully tried to pick spots that were low impact, but not full of logs.

In the evening we climbed Mt. Liberty to watch the sunset. It was a phenomenal view as light beams shot out from behind dark clouds.

After Trail I returned to this part of the trail and climbed Mt. Liberty with Mother Earth… then we got a very special view of this amazing place. I will post about this when we get there!!!